Windows 10 with JAWS for Windows Class One Outline

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Introduction

In this lesson, you’ll introduce students to the Windows Desktop and reading text in an application.

The Windows lock screen and login screen have options that students seldom take the time to explore.  We explain the options on these screens and what happens when the options are activated.

The first step in Windows access is Start Menu configuration. We have students enable recently used applications and recently installed applications because these two Start Menu features insure students can easily find applications on their computer. Recently installed is especially nice because  a lot of students have no idea where to find applications once their installed. With this option enabled, the applications are easily accessed in the Windows Start Menu.

We also visit Start Menu settings because it introduces students to Windows settings in a step-by-step fashion. Later in the course, they’ll revisit these settings and realize how far they’ve come in their understanding of Windows.

We explain the Desktop layout because a lot of students have gone blind later in life and still appreciate “visual” representations of applications. When they understand where elements are located on the display, they have a better understanding of the application and can more easily adapt to using the computer with a screen reader.

The Start Menu is explored in detail. There are several Desktop elements and we explore each. Including:

  • The search-edit field
  • The apps list
  • Navigation menu
  • Start Menu tiles

Take students through each element in turn and show them how their configurations customized the Start Menu to suit their needs. The folders they configured are displayed in the Navigation Menu. They can also fine-tune Start Menu tiles by changing live status, removing and adding tiles.

The Windows Application Menu or “Jump List” is a fundamental skill. Take  the time to show students how this menu changes in the Apps list, search results and Start Menu tiles. Jump lists are a powerful tool of Windows that students should learn so they can customize their Start Menu and Taskbar.

The Active Desktop is students’ first introduction to a list view. List views are used throughout Windows. They are found in File Explorer, the Open and Save as dialogs and in a lot of applications. Teach students how to navigate rows and columns with ALL FOUR ARROW KEYS. This navigation is used in a lot of applications such as creating bullets in WordPad which we’ll discuss in the next lesson.

The Active Desktop is also an opportunity to teach students “toggles.” Toggles take an action and reverse them with the same keystroke. WINDOWS KEY-D is the first toggle to which students are introduced. WINDOWS KEY-D moves focus to the Desktop and back to the last accessed application.

WINDOWS KEY-M introduces reverse navigation with SHIFT. In Windows, SHIFT reverses navigation. You’ll reinforce this throughout this course. It’s a fundamental concept that students should learn and remember.

The Taskbar is underused but a powerful feature that provides quick access to applications. Students can remove all pinned items and customize the Taskbar with their favorite applications. Using the Taskbar, students can save time and keystrokes by launching applications and using the Taskbar Jump Lists to directly open documents. Students should take the time to thoroughly explore the Taskbar and Jump Lists.

The Notification Area has applications that run in the background on the computer. Later in this course, you’ll show students how to manage applications in the Notification Area. Take some time to show students the overflow chevron and the difference between the Windows Application Menu and Pressing ENTER on an application in the Notification Area.

Show the students how to open and close applications on their computer. To illustrate skills addressed later in this lesson, make sure students have two or three applications open. Having documents open makes navigating among open applications via the keyboard and via the Task View will be easier with open applications.

The clock is docked in the bottom right of the display and is accessed with a JAWS for Windows command. This is where the use of “JAWS KEY” is illustrated. Regardless of the modifier key (CAPS LOCK or NUMPAD INSERT), students can read the clock with JAWS KEY-F12.

We introduce students to open application selection with ALT-TAB and ALT-SHIFT-TAB . Once again, SHIFT reverses navigation. This is another opportunity to reinforce this concept.

The Task View is re-visited later in this course when we discuss Virtual Desktops. Take the time to show students the Task View. While we visit applications in this lesson, encourage students to continue exploring beyond the applications in the Task View. There are additional options.

In this course, we always leave room for exploration. Students learn how to navigate the computer safely, so they can explore applications and find options that we don’t explain. Encourage your students to explore and play with their computer.

We introduce students to the WordPad display. The WordPad display is a standard Window with elements used in most Windows applications. Once again, we describe the display, so students have a special understanding of the actions they’re taking. The more information a student has, the easier it is to learn.

The last skills in this lesson are Windows text navigation commands and JAWS for Windows reading commands. The Windows text navigation commands work with or without a screen reader. These are Windows commands. Make sure students understand they are Windows commands so they have access to a text document regardless of the screen reader.

JAWS for Windows has commands to navigate text but I don’t teach them unless a student has limited hand mobility. They aren’t included in this lesson.  If you need additional instruction, please contact me and I’d be happy to provide it. Whenever possible, I teach Windows commands and use the screen reader to facilitate access rather than as absolute access.

Show students how to read with JAWS for Windows. Say All is a powerful tool. It’s surprising how many people don’t know about this command or that you can skim read and adjust speech rate when using Say All.

There are exercises included with this lesson that students can use to reinforce the skills. You can also ask students to demonstrate the skills in the exercise to insure they’ve learned the skills and are ready to move on to the next lesson.

CathyAnne

CathyAnne Murtha
cathy@blind.training
www.blind.training

Windows 10 with JAWS for Windows
Class One Outline

  1. Introduction
    1. Windows 10 Lock Screen
    2. Windows 10 Login Screen
    3. Configure the Windows 10 Start Menu
    4. The Windows Display
    5. The Start Menu
    6. Active Desktop
    7. Windows Taskbar
    8. Jump Lists
    9. Notification Area
    10. Close Applications
    11. Clock
    12. Navigate among Open Applications
    13. Open WordPad
    14. The WordPad Display
    15. Input Text
    16. Windows Text Navigation Commands
    17. JAWS for Windows Desktop Layout Reading Commands
    18. JAWS for Windows Laptop Layout Text Reading Commands
    19. JAWS for Windows Say All
    20. Adjust JAWS for Windows Speech Rate
  2. Windows 10 Lock Screen
    1. When you boot Windows, focus is placed on the lock Screen.
    2. The lock screen is a screen with a picture that displays when you lock your computer
    3. Tap ESCAPE to close the lock screen
    4. Focus is placed on the login screen
  3. Windows 10 Login Screen
    1. Log into Windows using the Windows 10 Login Screen
    2. The Login screen has an edit field into which you can place your password or PIN
    3. Additional options include:
      1. I forgot my PIN/Password
      2. This link opens a wizard through which you can recover your Windows password or Pin
    4. Sign-in options
      1. This expands two options through which you can choose a method to log in to your computer. Choose between:
        1. PIN
        2. Windows Password
      2. There are three buttons in the bottom right corner of the log in screen
        1. Network – This opens a panel through which you can review network connections
        2. Ease of Access – Enable accessibility features through this button
        3. Power – This button displays option to sleep, restart or shut down your computer
        4. Log in to your Windows account via this log-in screen and focus is placed on the Windows Desktop
      3. Configure the Windows 10 Start Menu
        1. Before continuing, let’s configure the Windows 10 Start Menu
        2. Once you’re familiar with the Start Menu, you can return to the Start Settings and fine-tune the settings to suit your needs
        3. Start Settings are opened via the Start Menu
          1. Open the Start Menu (WINDOWS KEY or CTRL-ESCAPE)
          2. Type “Start Settings” without the quotes
          3. Focus is placed on “Start Settings” in the search results
          4. Press ENTER to open Start Settings
        4. The Start Settings Window opens
          1. Focus is placed in an edit field
          2. Beneath the edit field is a list of property sheets
          3. Focus is already on the Start Menu property sheet
          4. Navigate with TAB until focus is on the “Show more tiles on Start” button. This is the first Start Menu configuration option
          5. Navigate among options with TAB and SHIFT-TAB
          6. Toggle buttons with SPACEBAR
          7. The following buttons are available:
            1. Show more tiles on Start – This shows an additional panel of tiles on the Start Menu. This option should be toggled off
            2. Show App List in Start Menu – When this option is checked, all installed apps are displayed on the Start Menu. This option should be toggled on
            3. Show recently added apps – This option insures recently installed apps are readily available in the Start Menu. This is nice if you aren’t sure how to access a newly installed application. This option should be toggled on
            4. Show most used apps – The apps you use most often are listed in the Start Menu, this is another nice feature and should be toggled on
            5. Occasionally show suggestions on start – This can be chatty, toggle this option off
            6. Use Start Full Screen – This uses the Windows 8.1 Start Screen interface. Toggle this option off
            7. Show recently opened items in the Jump Lists on the taskbar – If you’re on a private computer that isn’t shared, enable this option as it’s a nice way to quickly access items you’ve recently opened in applications. If you’re on a public or shared computer, disable this option
            8. The last option is Start Settings is a link, “Choose which folders appear on the Start”
              1. Activate this link to select folders displayed in the Start Menu navigation bar
                1. A new window opens with a list of folders. Each is associated with a button.
                2. Navigate among options with TAB and SHIFT-TAB
                3. Toggle buttons with SPACEBAR
                4. Choose from among:
                  1. File Explorer
                  2. Settings
                  3. Documents
                  4. Downloads
                  5. Music
                  6. Pictures
                  7. Videos
                  8. Home Group
                  9. Network
                  10. Personal Folder
          8. After configuring the folders you’d like displayed, close Start Settings with ALT-F4
  4. The Windows Desktop
    1. Describe the Display
      1. Most of the desktop is the active desktop. This is a list view.  List views are found throughout Windows
      2. I’ll discuss the Active Desktop shortly
    2. Slide a virtual ruler to the bottom of the display to replicate the Windows Taskbar, The Taskbar contains several elements
      1. Start Button
      2. Cortana Search field
      3. Taskbar Buttons
      4. System Tray
      5. Clock
  5. The Start Menu
    1. The Start Menu is opened from the Start Button. The Start button is in the bottom left of the display on the Taskbar
    2. Open the Start Menu with WINDOWS KEY or CTRL-ESCAPE
    3. The Start Menu provides access to every aspect of your computer. The Start Menu has several elements
      1. Navigation menu
      2. All Apps
      3. Start Menu Tiles
      4. Search Edit Field
    4. Close the Start Menu at any time with ESCAPE
    5. Start Menu Search Field
      1. When you open the Start Menu, focus is in the Search Edit field
      2. Type text into the search field to display search results in a list above the edit field.
        1. Navigate search results with UP AND DOWN ARROW
        2. Search results can include:
          1. Applications
          2. Recent Documents
          3. Windows Store Suggestions
          4. Documents
          5. Web search suggestions
          6. And more
        3. If you type the full name of an application, press ENTER to launch it immediately
        4. When focused on an item you’d like to open, press ENTER
      3. Edit the search field
        1. As focus moves in the search results, the text within the edit field changes to reflect the name of the focused item
        2. When navigating the search results, focus is still in the edit field, edit the text any time with your keyboard.
        3. Close the Start Menu at any time with ESCAPE
    6. Apps List
      1. The Apps list is above the Search Edit field of the Start Menu
      2. To access the Apps list:
        1. Open the Start Menu
        2. Press UP ARROW once to focus on the Apps List
        3. Use UP and DOWN ARROW to access apps
        4. Within the Apps list, you’ll find the options you configured in Start Settings:
          1. Recently Added
          2. Most used
          3. A list of apps in alphabetic order
        5. When focused on an app you’d like to launch, press ENTER
    7. Navigation Menu
      1. The Navigation Menu is on the left side of the start menu.
      2. To access the Navigation Menu:
        1. Open the Start Menu
        2. Press UP ARROW once to focus on the Apps list
        3. Press SHIFT-TAB once to focus on the Navigation Menu
        4. Navigate the options within the Navigation Menu with UP and DOWN ARROW
        5. The folders you configured in Start Settings are available in this Navigation Menu
        6. Press ENTER to Launch an option in the Navigation Menu 
        7. Options in the Navigation Menu include options you customized in Start Menu Settings
          1. User Account – This opens the User Account Settings 
          2. File Explorer – This opens the File Explorer Window
          3. Settings – This opens the Settings Window
          4. Power – This opens a drop-down list with the following options:
            1. Sleep
            2. Shut Down
            3. Restart
      3.  Tiles
        1. To access the tiles:
          1. Press UP ARROW once to access the Apps list
          2. Press TAB one time to focus in the tiles
          3. Notice how TAB and SHIFT-TAB moves focus through elements of the Start Menu
        2. The Start menu Tiles are on the right side of the Start Menu 
          1. Navigate among tiles with ALL FOUR ARROW KEYS
          2. Activate a tile with ENTER
          3. When you pin apps to the Start Menu, they’re added to the tiles
          4. Some tiles within the Start Menu are live
            1. Live tiles display content from the Internet or applications
            2. The “News” app displays the latest headlines
            3. The Calendar app displays upcoming appointments
      4. The Windows Application Menu
        1. The Windows Application Menu is available in the Start Menu Apps list, search results, and Tiles
        2. Open the Windows Application Menu with the WINDOWS APPLICATION KEY
          1. The WINDOWS APPLICATION KEY is to the left of the right CTRL KEY on the keyboard
        3. The options in the menu depend on the type of item focused
        4. From within the App list:
          1. Open the Start Menu
          2. Press UP ARROW to focus on the Apps list.
          3. Focus on an App and open the Windows Application Menu:
          4. The following options are available
            1. Pin to Start – The item is pinned to the Start Menu Tiles (If an item is already pinned, an unpin option is available)
            2. Pin to Taskbar – The item is pinned to the Taskbar (If an item is already pinned, an unpin option is available)
            3. Uninstall – The associated application is uninstalled
            4. Run as Administrator – The application runs with administrative privileges
            5. Open File location – The location of the file opens in File Explorer
            6. Don’t show in this list – The item is removed from the Start Menu List
            7. Pin an application to the Start Menu
        5. From within Start Menu Search Results
          1. Open the Start Menu
          2. Search for an application such as “WordPad”
          3. Open the Windows Application Menu
          4. Depending upon the application focused, the following may be available:
            1. Run as Administrator – The application runs with administrative privileges
            2. Open File location – The location of the file opens in File Explorer
            3. Pin to Start – The item is pinned to the Start Menu Tiles (If an item is already pinned, an unpin option is available)
            4. Pin to Taskbar – The item is pinned to the Taskbar (If an item is already pinned, an unpin option is available)
            5. Uninstall – The associated application is uninstalled
          5. From within the Tiles
            1. Open the Start Menu
            2. Press UP ARROW to focus on the Apps List
            3. Press TAB once to focus on the Start Menu Tiles
            4. Navigate among tiles with ALL FOUR ARROW KEYS
            5. When focused on a tile associated with a Windows app, the following are available in the Windows Application Menu :
              1. Unpin from Start – The app is removed from the start Menu Tiles
              2. Resize – This opens a sub menu. Live tiles must be at least medium in size. The following options are available:
                1. Small
                2. Medium
                3. Wide
                4. Large
              3. Turn Live Tile on/off – This option toggles the state of a live tile
              4. Pin to Taskbar – The focused app is pinned to the Taskbar (If the item is already pinned, an unpin option is available)
              5. When focused on a tile associated with a Desktop application, the following options are available in the Windows Application Menu
              6. Unpin from Start
              7. Resize
              8. Uninstall
              9. Run as Administrator
              10. Open File Location
  6. Shut Down and Restart the computer
    1. The power options are in the Start Menu
    2. Open the Start Menu
    3. Focus in the Navigation Menu
    4. Within the Navigation Menu, activate “Power”
    5. Within the drop-down list, choose and activate one of the following:
      1. Sleep
      2. Restart
      3. Shutdown
  7. The Active Desktop
    1. The Active Desktop occupies a majority of the Windows Desktop display
    2. To focus on the Windows Desktop, use two commands.
      1. WINDOWS KEY-D or WINDOWS KEY-M
      2. WINDOWS KEY-D is a toggle
        1. When you’re focused in an application and press WINDOWS KEY-D, focus is moved straight to the desktop.
        2. Press WINDOWS KEY-D a second time and focus returns to the last accessed application
        3. When a command takes an action and reverses it, it’s a toggle. WINDOWS KEY-D is a toggle
      3. WNDOWS KEY-M moves focus to the Desktop but it’s a single-action key. You can’t reverse the command with the same keystroke because it isn’t a toggle
      4. To reverse this command, add SHIFT. SHIFT reverses navigation in Windows.  Press WINDOWS KEY-SHIFT-M to return focus to the last accessed application.
    3. The Desktop is a list view and contains icons
      1. Icons are small graphics that represent locations on your computer or the Internet
      2. The Desktop can’t be placed in a plain list. It always has icons
      3. Icon Shortcuts can include:
        1. Applications
        2. Web sites
        3. Folders
        4. Documents
        5. Email addresses
        6. And more
    4. Navigate the Desktop in several ways:
      1. Use ALL FOUR ARROW KEYS
      2. Press the first letter of an icon name
      3. Press the first several letters of an icon name
      4. Notice circular navigation
        1. When you navigate with first letter navigation, focus moves to each icon that starts with the letter and returns to the first icon
        2. Navigation in Windows is circular, you can’t get lost
      5. When focused on an icon whose associated application you’d like to launch, press ENTER
      6. The application launches, and focus is placed in the application
  8. The Taskbar
    1. The Taskbar is at the bottom of the Windows Desktop
    2. Slide a ruler to the bottom of the Desktop to replicate the Windows Taskbar
    3. WINDOWS KEY-T focuses on the Taskbar from anywhere within Windows.
    4. Navigate among the applications on the Taskbar with RIGHT and LEFT ARROW
    5. The Taskbar contains applications that have been “Pinned” to it and applications that have been recently accessed.
    6. Press ENTER to activate or bring focus to an application
    7. WINDOWS KEY and the number row are used to launch applications from within the Taskbar.
      1. The first application is launched with WINDOWS KEY-NUMBER ROW 1
      2. The second application is launched with WINDOWS KEY-NUMBER ROW 2
      3. Take a moment to launch an application from within the Taskbar
      4. Close the application with ALT-F4
      5. Return to the Taskbar at any time with WINDOWS KEY-T
  9. Jump Lists
    1. When you press open the Windows Application Meny (WINDOWS APPLICATION KEY or SHIFT-F10) on an application in the Taskbar, the “Jump List” opens
    2. Jump lists are menus with options specific to the focused application. Options may include:
    3. A list of recently accessed documents or locations
      1. Tasks specific to the application
      2. Options to pin and unpin applications
      3. Options to close all open Windows associated with the application
    4. Open and Navigate a Jump List
      1. Focus on an application in the Windows Taskbar (WINDOWS KEY-T)
      2. Open the application Jump list with WINDOWS APPLICATION KEY or SHIFT-F10
      3. Navigate the Jump List menu with UP AND DOWN ARROW
      4. To take an action in the Jump List, press ENTER
      5. If you press ESCAPE while in a Jump List, press WINDOWS KEY-T to return to the Taskbar
    5. Unpin an application from the Taskbar
      1. Focus on the application in the Taskbar
      2. Open the Jump List (WINDOWS APPLICATION KEY or SHIFt-F10)
      3. Activate “Unpin this Program from Taskbar”
      4. The application is removed from the Taskbar
    6. You can open Jump Lists from anywhere within Windows
      1. Press WINDOWS KEY-ALT-NUMBER ROW Value.
      2. WINDOWS KEY-ALT-NUMBER ROW 1 opens the Jump List for the first application on the Start Menu
      3. WINDOWS KEY-ALT-NUMBER ROW 2 opens the Jump List for the second application on the Start Menu
      4. Etc.
    7. Pin Items in the Jump List
      1. If there are documents or locations, you frequently access. You can pin them to the Jump List
      2. Focus on a document or location in the Jump List and open the Windows Application Menu
      3. In the menu, activate “Pin to this List”
      4. The document or location is pinned to the top of the Jump List and remains there until you remove it
    8. You can remove pinned documents or locations in the same way
      1. To remove an item
        1. Focus on the pinned item in the Jump list
        2. Open the Windows Application Menu (WINDOWS APPLICATION KEY or SHIFT-F10)
        3. Within the Jump List, activate “Unpin from this list.”
        4. The item is removed from the pinned list
    9. Navigation among application documents with Taskbar commands
      1. If multiple documents are open, press WINDOWS KEY-NUMBER ROW VALUE repeatedly to locate the document you’d like to open.
      2. EXAMPLE:
        1. If WINDOWS KEY-1 launches Microsoft Word and you have two Word documents open – hold down WINDOWS KEY and tap 1 repeatedly to rotor among open documents.
        2. Release both keys to focus in the selected document
  10. Notification Area
    1. The Notification Area or “System Tray” contains applications that are active on your computer but aren’t used enough to require placement in the Taskbar 
    2. Notification Area applications may include:
      1. Sound options
      2. Antivirus
      3. JAWS for Windows (if configured to display in the System Tray)
      4. Microsoft OneDrive
      5. And more
    3. The Notification Area is on the bottom right side of the Desktop. It’s on the far-right side of the Taskbar
    4. Focus in theNotification Area with WINDOWS KEY-B 
    5. Once focused in the Notification Area:
      1. Use RIGHT and LEFT ARROW to navigate among the application icons
      2. Press ENTER to focus in an application
    6. Open the Windows Application Menu from which you can take actions or open configurations
    7.  Clock
      1. The clock resides to the far right of the Taskbar
      2. Read the clock with JAWS for Windows
      3. Read the clock JAWS KEY-F12 (repeat to hear date)
  11. Close Applications
    1. We’ve discussed several ways to open applications
      1. From within the Start Menu Apps List
      2. Via a Start Menu search
      3. Activate a tile in the Start Menu
      4. Activate an icon shortcut on the Active Desktop
      5. Activate an application from within the Taskbar
    2. Close applications in Windows with ALT-F4
    3. ALT-F4 closes any application in Windows
  12. Navigate among open applications
    1. You can have a lot of applications open on your computer
    2. The number of applications is only limited by your computer’s memory
    3. When multiple applications are open, navigate among open applications in a several ways
      1. Use Taskbar keyboard commands to open an application or focus on an application document
      2. Navigate among open applications with the keyboard
        1. Move forward among open applications
          1. Hold down ALT and don’t let go
          2. Press TAB repeatedly to navigate among the open applications
          3. When focused on the application you’d like to access, release both keys
        2. Move backward among open applications:
          1. Hold down ALT-SHIFT and don’t let go
          2. Tap TAB repeatedly to move backward among applications
          3. Notice how “SHIFT” reverses navigation, this is standard in Windows
          4. When focused on an application upon which you’d like to focus, release all keys
        3. ALT-TAB navigates forward among applications
        4. ALT-SHIFT-TAB navigates backwards among applications
      3. The Task View
        1. Press WINDOWS KEY-TAB to open a list of open applications
        2. The applications are displayed as thumbnails on the display
        3. Navigate among the applications with RIGHT and LEFT ARROW
        4. When focused on the application upon which you’d like to focus, press ENTER
        5. Focus is placed in the selected application
  13. Open WordPad
    1. Use the Windows Start Menu
    2. Open the Windows Start Menu
    3. Type “WordPad” without the quotes
    4. Because there’s only one application with the name WordPad in Windows 10, press ENTER to launch the application
  14. The WordPad Display
    1. Give an overview of the display of WordPad so students have an idea of the spatial layout of an application window
      1. Take a ruler and slide it to the top of the display – This represents the Title Bar
        1. The title bar contains the name of the application and focused document
        2. Read the title bar with JAWS for Windows (JAWS KEY-T)
      2. Slide the ruler down one notch to replicate the Ribbon Tabs
        1. The Ribbon Tabs are aligned horizontally along the display
        2. Each ribbon Tab has a key tip (This is the term used for “shortcut keys.)
      3. Slide the ruler down one more notch
        1. This is the active ribbon 
      4. Slide the ruler to the bottom of the display (above the Windows Taskbar)
        1. This is the status bar. JAWS for Windows reads the status bar
          1. Desktop layout JAWS KEY-NUMPAD 3
          2. Laptop layout JAWS KEY-PAGE DOWN
        2. Most of the display is the document window
          1. The document window is under the ribbon but above the status bar
  15. Input and Read Text
    1. When WordPad is open, focus is in the document window
    2. Input text via your keyboard.
    3. Windows Navigation Commands
    4. Windows provides access to text in edit fields
    5. You can read the next and previous letter, word, line, and navigate among paragraph, pages and to the top and bottom of documents.
    6. These commands are Windows commands and can be used regardless of the screen reader
    7. The navigation commands of Windows are:
      1. Move to the next letter RIGHT ARROW
      2. Move to the previous letter LEFT ARROW
      3. Move to the next word CTRL-RIGHT ARROW
      4. Move to the previous word CTRL-LEFT ARROW
      5. Move to the next line DOWN ARROW
      6. Move to the previous line UP ARROW
      7. Move to the next paragraph CTRL-DOWN ARROW
      8. Move to the previous paragraph CTRL-UP ARROW
      9. Move to the next screen PAGE DOWN
      10. Move to the previous screen PAGE UP
      11. Move to the next page CTRL-PAGE DOWN
      12. Move to the previous page CTRL-PAGE UP
      13. Move to the beginning of the line HOME
      14. Move to the end of the line END
      15. Move to the top of a document CTRL-HOME
      16. Move to the bottom of a document CTRL-END
      17. Notice that Windows accesses the next and previous word, character, etc. but doesn’t allow us access to the current character or current word.  This is because sighted users need to navigate with the keyboard as well.  While we are moving our cursor with Windows commands, the screen reader is echoing the information.
    8. JAWS Reading Commands:
      1. JAWS provides access to current information
      2. Jaws has named its Modifier Key the “Jaws Key” because the modifier can be set to several keys on the keyboard, I use the term JAWS KEY to reference the JAWS modifier.
      3. Desktop Layout Reading Commands
        1. Read the current letter NUMPAD FIVE
        2. Enable phonetic letter mode NUMPAD FIVE twice – disable this by pressing the NUMPAD FIVE once more.
        3. Read the current word JAWS KEY-NUMPAD FIVE
        4. Word spell mode JAWS KEY-NUMPAD FIVE twice – disable this by pressing the NUMPAD FIVE once.
        5. Read the current line JAWS KEY -NUMPAD EIGHT
        6. Read the current sentence ALT-NUMPAD FIVE
        7. Read the prior sentence ALT-NUMPAD EIGHT
        8. Read the next sentence ALT-NUMPAD TWO
        9. Read the current paragraph CTRL-NUMPAD FIVE
        10. Read from the beginning of a line to the cursor location JAWS KEY -NUMPAD SEVEN
        11. Read from the cursor location to the end of the line JAWS KEY -NUMPAD NINE
        12. Read from the cursor location to the end of the document with JAWS KEY-NUMPAD TWO (Say All)
          1. When reading with Say All, press RIGHT and LEFT ARROW to skim back and forth within the text
        13. Press CTRL to silence speech at any time
      4. Laptop Layout Reading Commands
        1. Read the Current Letter JAWS KEY-COMMA
        2. Read the Current Word JAWS KEY-K
        3. Read the Current Line JAWS KEY-I
        4. Read the Prior Sentence JAWS KEY-Y
        5. Read the Current Sentence JAWS KEY-H
        6. Read the Next Sentence JAWS KEY-N
        7. Read the Prior Paragraph JAWS KEY-CTRL-U
        8. Read the Current Paragraph JAWS KEY-CTRL-I
        9. Read the Next Paragraph JAWS KEY-CTRL-O
        10. Read from the beginning of the line to the Cursor JAWS KEY-HOME or JAWS KEY-SHIFT-J
        11. Read from the cursor to the end of the line JAWS KEY-PAGE DOWN or JAWS KEY-SHIFT-L
        12. Read from the cursor to the end of the document (Say All) JAWS KEY A or JAWS KEY DOWN ARROW
        13. When reading with Say All, skip back and forth in the text with RIGHT and LEFT ARROW
        14. Silence speech at any time with CTRL
        15. Spell passages of text with JAWS for Windows
          1. Spell the Current Word JAWS KEY-K twice quickly (Navigate word by word with the above Windows commands to hear the words spelled, tap ESCAPE to exit spelling mode.)
          2. Spell Current Line JAWS KEY-I twice quickly
          3. Spell from the beginning of the line to the cursor JAWS KEY-HOME or JAWS KEY-SHIFT-I twice quickly
          4. Spell from the cursor to the end of the line JAWS KEY-PAGE UP or JAWS KEY-SHIFT-L twice quickly
    9. Say All Review
      1. Say All reads from the cursor location to the end of the document
      2. The Say All commands are:
        1. Desktop JAWS KEY-NUMPAD TWO
        2. Laptop JAWS KEY-A or JAWS KEY-DOWN ARROW
      3. When in Say All, you can perform the following:
        1. Increase the rate of speech PAGE UP
        2. Decrease the rate of speech PAGE DOWN
        3. Skip back and forth in the text RIGHT and LEFT ARROW
        4. Silence speech CTRL
      4. You can use Say All in any edit field of Windows
  16. Adjust JAWS for Windows Speech Rate
    1. Temporarily Increase the Rate of Speech with JAWS on-the-fly
      1. Increase the rate of speech CTRL-ALT-PAGE UP
      2. Decrease the rate of speech CTRL-ALT-PAGE DOWN
    2. Permanently Increase the Rate of Speech with JAWS on-the-fly
      1. Press CTRL-ALT-WINDOWS KEY-PAGE UP to increase the rate
      2. Press CTRL-ALT-WINDOAWS KEY-PAGE DOWN to decrease the rate
  17.  Summary
    1. Windows 10 Lock Screen
    2. Windows 10 Login Screen
    3. Configure the Windows 10 Start Menu
    4. The Windows Display
    5. The Start Menu
    6. Active Desktop
    7. Windows Taskbar
    8. Jump Lists
    9. Notification Area
    10. Clock
    11. Navigate among Open Applications
    12. Close Applications
    13. Open WordPad
    14. The WordPad Display
    15. Input Text
    16. Windows Text Navigation Commands
    17. JAWS for Windows Desktop Layout Reading Commands
    18. JAWS for Windows Laptop Layout Text Reading Commands
    19. JAWs for Windows Say All
    20. Adjust JAWS for Windows Speech Rate

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